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The freedom to ultimately decide for yourself

Once self-employed, always self-employed. At least that's how I feel. Of course there are also times when I have doubts and consider whether the price for running my own game is too high? Or if the free hours are actually priceless and therefore worth every privation?

The freedom to ultimately decide for yourself

Like many other small business owners I occasionally consider looking for a real job.

Life as a freelancer can be both tough and nerve-wracking. Not least during periods when you work on developing your portfolio with a number of personal projects and thus invest a good part of your time as interest hours, you can feel the financial pressure and start doubting your own sanity.

As a self-employed, on the other hand, you have complete freedom to do as you see fit: also to make choices that go against common practice or what the majority would call common sense.

Add to that the fact that doing the (necessary) administrative work in a one-man business can be a part-time position in itself. Only when that time is spent can you even begin to consider working some billable hours.

It is no coincidence that many people give up the dream of being self-employed in favor of a more traditional business career.

And yet . . . .

As I aways remind myself, I call myself self-employed and a freelance artist for a reason.

Although I would of course love the financial security being an employee, I know only too well that I'd also feel trapped and limited in a way I wouldn't be able to live with in the long run.

Unfortunately, the price for contractual employment is that ultimately there are limits to what decisions you can make, yourself. As an employee you cannot necessarily flex your own schedule or take days out of the calendar for personal projects at will.

Even at executive level, you refer to a board, and more or less well-founded demands from investors and shareholders.

As a self-employed, on the other hand, you have complete freedom to do as you see fit: also to make choices that go against common practice or what the majority would call common sense.

You can enjoy the freedom to go against the grain and insist on your own crazy idea.

But real freedom also requires a certain degree of financial freedom, you might object?

And that is absolutely true. Real freedom indeed requires a certain degree of financial freedom. This is precisely why, as mentioned, I periodically reconsider my status. . . . and always end up concluding that I will stay afloat no matter what.

As self-employed, you can precisely utilize your ultimate freedom and adapt from hour to hour and come up with new creative business initiatives that can generate the necessary minimum turnover.

The fact that you are free also means that you can bring your freedom into play by looking for new markets or, at times, bet fully on the daily grind. Whatever the situation calls for.

It is your choice and your responsibility.

Therefore, you also have to be present and have both your head and your heart involved in what you are doing. I honestly can't think of a better way to work.

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